Toshi Walker

‘The natural menopause solutions that worked for me’

Looking for some inside tips to get you through the menopause? Find out what our Me.No.Pause ladies rely on, from a vegan diet to positive thinking

Written by Carole Beck on January 10, 2018

Sometimes, we all need a helping hand to get through the menopause. Here’s what four incredible women featured in our Me.No.Pause campaign swear by to help them adapt to this change of life.

Exercising little and often

Bunny Cook

For Bunny Cook, 47, daily exercise has helped control her symptoms through the perimenopause. She walks her dog for half an hour a day, runs 5k three times a week, goes to a weekly yoga class and also swims for half an hour twice a week. ‘Exercise helps you feel more in control, no matter what your symptoms are,’ she says. ‘The type of exercise I do is also very meditative and calms any anxiety.’

Thinking positively

Cassandra Fellingham-Orr

Cassandra Fellingham-Orr, 38, believes that a positive mind-set is the key to a better menopause. This often means pushing herself to attend one of her regular boxing or running sessions, even when she feels low. ‘I know I’ll have much more energy once the endorphins get going,’ she says. ‘But you need to allow yourself bad days, too. I’m not ashamed of a hot flush but if you’re in denial during the menopause, it can make everything feel a whole lot harder.’

Going vegan

Toshi Walker

A complete change of diet was Toshi Walker’s solution to help manage her menopause symptoms, such as hot flushes and mood swings. Toshi, 56, who also has multiple sclerosis, swapped meat for an organic, vegan diet and now starts every day with a supergreen high-protein shake. She says, ‘I was putting on weight when I entered the menopause and felt that meat was becoming harder to digest. Now I don’t feel heavy when I eat, I have more energy and fewer hot flushes, and I’ve lost weight too, particularly around my stomach.’

Practicing ‘kindfulness’

Atifa Ismailmiya-Balding

Atifa Ismailmiya-Balding, 47, practices ‘kindfulness’ – in other words, being kind to herself. ‘If I’m having a bad menopause day, I will stop, pause and do something I enjoy,’ she says. ‘I also meditate and practice mindfulness and yoga.’ At bedtime, Atifa makes a soothing Indian turmeric milk drink – a family recipe handed down by her mother – and writes a gratitude diary. Part of Atifa’s ‘kindfulness’ routine is also taking certain supplements. She says, ‘I find Weleda Avena Sativa Comp Drops and 5-HTP help stabilise my mood, while A. Vogel’s Menoforce Sage tablets relieve my hot flushes and night sweats.’

Advice is for information only and should not replace medical care. Please check with your GP before trying any remedies.

Related Topics

Menopause