shopping bag with fruit and vegetables spilling out

Vegan shopping list essentials

Fruit

Include a variety of fresh, dried and frozen fruits in your weekly shop.

 

Frozen fruits are great for adding to smoothies.

 

And dried fruits, such as raisins, dried apricots and prunes, are vegan-friendly sources of calcium.

Fruit

Vegetables

Eating a colourful array of vegetables contributes a healthy dose of vitamins and minerals to a vegan diet.

 

In particular, leafy greens (like broccoli and cabbage) can add non-animal calcium and iron to your diet.

Vegetables

Pulses and legumes

Beans, lentils and soy products (such as tofu) are plant-based sources of protein and nutrient-rich ingredients for vegan meals.

Pulses and legumes

Nuts and seeds

Keep a healthy stock of nuts and seeds for adding a vegan dose of protein, iron and omega-3 fatty acids to a meal or snack.

Nuts and seeds

Herbs and spices

Adding a sprinkling of herbs and spices adds extra depth and taste interest to vegan dishes.

Herbs and spices

Dairy alternatives

From coconut yoghurts to cashew milk, there are dairy alternatives to suit every vegan tastebud.

Dairy alternatives

Whole grains

Whole grains, such as quinoa, millet and buckwheat, are a staple food group for a healthy vegan diet.

 

They are great for Buddha bowls and salads, as well as a baking ingredient.

Whole grains

1. Tempeh

Formed from cooked, fermented soybeans, cooked tempeh boasts 20g of protein in every 100g.

 

It’s also low in fat and contains calcium and iron. With a chewy texture, it adds a distinctive taste to soups, stews and stir fries.

1. Tempeh

2. Tofu

Made from condensed soy milk, tofu contains 8g of protein and just 70g calories in every 100g.

 

It’s also a good meat-free source of calcium, iron and could have other health benefits.

 

Perfect for stir fries or curries, firm tofu can be grilled and used in salads. Softer varieties of tofu can be used in desserts and sauces.

2. Tofu

3. Chia seeds

A beneficial source of omega-3 fatty acids for vegans, chia seeds also contain 16.5g of protein and 34g of fibre in every 100g.

 

Due to their subtle taste, chia seeds can be used in a wide range of dishes from sweet to savoury.

 

Simply sprinkle on to salad or add to smoothies. They can also be added to porridge, used as an egg replacement in baking, or as a sauce thickener.

3. Chia seeds

4. Teff

A fine grain with a delicate nutty flavour, teff mainly grows in Ethiopia and Eritrea.

 

High in calcium and iron, it also boasts 4g of protein in every 100g.

 

Teff can be boiled or steamed and eaten whole but can also be ground into a gluten-free flour. Use teff flour in baking to make delicious biscuits or bread.

4. Teff

5. Seitan

Pronounced (say-tahn), seitan is a high protein meat alternative with a mild taste.

 

Although it has a very similar texture to meat when cooked, it’s made from wheat.

 

For a protein boost in meat-free curries, stir fries or stews, simply pan fry or grill seitan before adding to your usual recipe for extra flavour.

5. Seitan

6. Yeast flakes

With a cheesy flavour, nutritional yeast can be used to make ‘cheesy’ sauces or add flavour to gravy, soups, salad or even breakfast cereals.

 

Nutritional yeast flakes are made from single-celled members of the fungi family which is grown on molasses.

 

Low in fat and gluten-free, it’s packed with nutrients like folic acid, selenium, zinc, and protein. It also contains vitamin B12 (usually found naturally in foods from animal sources) which is why vegans may find nutritional yeast fortified with B12 beneficial to their diets.

6. Yeast flakes

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Vegan

Bhupesh Panchal,
Senior Regulatory Affairs Associate

Joined Holland & Barrett: Apr 2019

Masters Degree in Toxicology and BSc Hons in Medical Biochemistry

Bhupesh started his career as a Clinical Toxicologist for Public Health England, advising healthcare professionals all around the country on how to manage clinical cases of adverse exposure to supplements, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, industrial chemicals and agricultural products.

After 7 years in this role and a further year working as a drug safety officer in the pharmaceutical industry, Bhupesh joined Holland & Barrett as a Senior Regulatory Affairs Associate in 2019.