Alternative sources of nutrients found in eggs

Eggs are often hailed as the ‘perfect food’ from a nutritional point of view. They certainly bring a lot to the table in terms of vitamins, minerals, protein and healthy fats. However, for many of us, eating eggs isn’t an option. Read on to find out how you can benefit from the nutritional profile of eggs when your diet is egg-free.


Choline


This essential nutrient is important for overall health, and particularly important for liver and brain function. While egg yolks are a particularly rich source, you can find choline in milk, soy flour, quinoa and wheat germ. Other sources include beef, cod, salmon and chicken liver.


Lutein and zeaxanthin


These antioxidants are known for boosting vision and helping to protect the eyes from macular degeneration.1 Green leafy vegetables such as kale and spinach, are excellent non-egg sources, as are Swiss chard, pumpkin and corn.


Selenium


This mineral works with antioxidants to help protect your cells. It’s also vital for metabolism and thyroid health, as well as promoting good cardiovascular and reproductive health. Find selenium in Brazil nuts, cottage cheese, brown rice and whole wheat bread.


Folic acid


This vitamin helps the formation of red blood cells and helps avoid anaemia. Sources aside from eggs includes green leafy vegetables such as spinach, kale, sprouts and broccoli, as well as beans and legumes and wholegrain foods.2


Vitamin A


In eggs, vitamin A comes in pure form, which is also known as retinol. However, you can also find this form of vitamin A in cheese, milk and yoghurt. Vitamin A from vegetables comes in the form of beta-carotene, which is converted to vitamin A in the body and is found in sweet potatoes, peppers, spinach, as well as yellow fruits such as mango. 3


Protein


This essential nutrient is responsible for many functions including building healthy tissues and skin. Eggs and meat have a good amount of protein- but don’t worry! So do pulses- but make sure it’s a ‘complete’protein- which means a protein which offers a balance of amino acids. Add rice to beans or lentils to make your egg-free protein complete.


Omega-3 fatty acids


This essential fatty acid is vital for the health of your joints, brain and heart. Sources include flax seeds, algae, chia seeds, and leafy greens.

Advice is for information only and should not replace medical care. Please check with your GP before trying any remedies.

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 Sources

  1. https://www.rnib.org.uk/eye-health-eye-conditions-age-related-macular-degeneration-amd/nutritional-supplements-age-related.
  2. https://www.bda.uk.com/foodfacts/FolicAcid.pdf.
  3. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vitamins-and-minerals/vitamin-a/.